Medicine and science fiction

Here, courtesy of the Zotpress plugin, are the latest.

Shapiro, J. F. (1998). Atomic bomb cinema: illness, suffering, and the apocalyptic narrative. Literature and Medicine, 17(1), 126–148. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9604848
Miksanek, T. (2001). Microscopic doctors and molecular black bags: science fiction’s prescription for nanotechnology and medicine. Literature and Medicine, 20(1), 55–70. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11411034
Hughes, J. J., & Lantos, J. (2001). Medical ethics through the Star Trek lens. Literature and Medicine, 20(1), 26–38. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11411031
Wolfe, A. J. (2002). Germs in Space: Joshua Lederberg, Exobiology, and the Public Imagination, 1958-1964. Isis, 93(2), 183–205. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3080808
Resnik, D. B. (1998). Germ-Line Manipulations, Private Industry, and Secrecy. Politics and the Life Sciences, 17(1), 29–30. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/4236402
Klugman, C. M. (2001). From cyborg fiction to medical reality. Literature and Medicine, 20(1), 39–54. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11411033
Kirby, D. A. (2004). Extrapolating race in GATTACA: genetic passing, identity, and the science of race. Literature and Medicine, 23(1), 184–200; discussion 201–204. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15264515
Pomidor, B., & Pomidor, A. K. (2006). Essay:“With great power…” The relevance of science fiction to the practice and progress of medicine. The Lancet, 368, 13–14.
Charon, R., & Montello, M. (1998). Literature and medicine: an on-line guide. Annals of Internal Medicine, 128(11), 959–962. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9634447
Tomes, N. (2002). Epidemic Entertainments: Disease and Popular Culture in Early-Twentieth-Century America. American Literary History, 14(4), 625–652.